#ShellShock Bug attacks BASH

Standard

I saw this on The Register (original Article HERE), but thought the story was important enough to post –

Patch Bash NOW: ‘Shell Shock’ bug blasts OS X, Linux systems wide open

Updated A bug discovered in the widely used Bash command interpreter poses a critical security risk to Unix and Linux systems – and, thanks to their ubiquity, the internet at large.

It lands countless websites, servers, PCs, OS X Macs, various home routers, and more, in danger of hijacking by hackers.

The vulnerability is present in Bash up to and including version 4.3, and was discovered by Stephane Chazelas. It puts Apache web servers, in particular, at risk of compromise: CGI scripts that use or invoke Bash in any way – including any child processes spawned by the scripts – are vulnerable to remote-code injection. OpenSSH and some DHCP clients are also affected on machines that use Bash.

Ubuntu and other Debian-derived systems that use Dash exclusively are not at risk – Dash isn’t vulnerable, but busted versions of Bash may well be present on the systems anyway. It’s essential you check the shell interpreters you’re using, and any Bash packages you have installed, and patch if necessary.

“Holy cow. There are a lot of .mil and .gov sites that are going to get owned,” security expert Kenn White said on Wednesday in reaction to the disclosed flaw.

The 22-year-old bug, dating back to version 1.13, lies in Bash’s handling of environment variables: when assigning a function to a variable, trailing code in the function definition will be executed, leaving the door wide open for code-injection attacks. The vulnerability is exploitable remotely if code can be smuggled into environment variables sent over the network – and it’s surprisingly easy to do so.

According to the NIST vulnerability database, which rates the flaw 10 out of 10 in terms of severity:

GNU Bash through 4.3 processes trailing strings after function definitions in the values of environment variables, which allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted environment, as demonstrated by vectors involving the ForceCommand feature in OpenSSH sshd, the mod_cgi and mod_cgid modules in the Apache HTTP Server, scripts executed by unspecified DHCP clients, and other situations in which setting the environment occurs across a privilege boundary from Bash execution.

Authentication: Not required to exploit

Impact Type: Allows unauthorized disclosure of information; Allows unauthorized modification; Allows disruption of service

An advisory from Akamai explains the problem in more depth, as does this OSS-Sec mailing list post.

Proof-of-concept code for exploiting Bash-using CGI scripts to run code with the same privileges as the web server is already floating around the web. A simple Wget fetch can trigger the bug on a vulnerable system.

You can check if you’re vulnerable by running the following lines in your default shell, which on many systems will be Bash. If you see the words “busted”, then you’re at risk. If not, then either your Bash is fixed or your shell is using another interpreter.

env X="() { :;} ; echo busted" /bin/sh -c "echo completed"
env X="() { :;} ; echo busted" `which bash` -c "echo completed"

Jim Reavis, chief exec of the Cloud Security Alliance, claims the hole is comparable in seriousness to the infamous password-leaking Heartbleed bug in the OpenSSL library that was uncovered earlier this year.

“A large number of programs on Linux and other UNIX systems use Bash to setup environmental variables which are then used while executing other programs,” Reavis explained in a blog post.

“Examples of this include web servers running CGI scripts and even email clients and web clients that pass files to external programs for display such as a video file or a sound file.

“In short this vulnerability allows attackers to cause arbitrary command execution, remotely, for example by setting headers in a web request, or by setting weird MIME types.”

Robert Graham of Errata Security, who suggested the name Shell Shock for the Bash flaw, also said the programming cock-up is as severe as Heartbleed. But he noted: “There’s little need to rush and fix this bug. Your primary servers are probably not vulnerable to this bug.

“However, everything else probably is. Scan your network for things like Telnet, FTP, and old versions of Apache (masscan is extremely useful for this). Anything that responds is probably an old device needing a bash patch. And, since most of them can’t be patched, you are likely screwed.

“A lot of wireless routers shell out to ping and traceroute – these are all likely vulnerable.”

The vulnerability (CVE-2014-6271) affects Apple’s OS X – and is useful for privilege escalation – as well as major flavors of Linux. Fortunately, patches are already available, and distros are ahead of the game in responding to the flap. BSD distros that do not use Bash are safe, obviously. Apple users will need to get their hands dirty until Cupertino issues a fix.

Red Hat security engineer Huzaifa Sidhpurwala has a rundown of the at-risk software, here. ®

Updated to add

Linux vendor Red Hat has warned the patch to fix Bash is not complete, and there are still ways to inject commands via environment variables. In an update at 0310 GMT, Red Hat said:

Red Hat has become aware that the patch for CVE-2014-6271 is incomplete. An attacker can provide specially-crafted environment variables containing arbitrary commands that will be executed on vulnerable systems under certain conditions. The new issue has been assigned CVE-2014-7169. Red Hat is working on patches in conjunction with the upstream developers as a critical priority.

 

Updated A bug discovered in the widely used Bash command interpreter poses a critical security risk to Unix and Linux systems – and, thanks to their ubiquity, the internet at large.

It lands countless websites, servers, PCs, OS X Macs, various home routers, and more, in danger of hijacking by hackers.

The vulnerability is present in Bash up to and including version 4.3, and was discovered by Stephane Chazelas. It puts Apache web servers, in particular, at risk of compromise: CGI scripts that use or invoke Bash in any way – including any child processes spawned by the scripts – are vulnerable to remote-code injection. OpenSSH and some DHCP clients are also affected on machines that use Bash.

Ubuntu and other Debian-derived systems that use Dash exclusively are not at risk – Dash isn’t vulnerable, but busted versions of Bash may well be present on the systems anyway. It’s essential you check the shell interpreters you’re using, and any Bash packages you have installed, and patch if necessary.

“Holy cow. There are a lot of .mil and .gov sites that are going to get owned,” security expert Kenn White said on Wednesday in reaction to the disclosed flaw.

The 22-year-old bug, dating back to version 1.13, lies in Bash’s handling of environment variables: when assigning a function to a variable, trailing code in the function definition will be executed, leaving the door wide open for code-injection attacks. The vulnerability is exploitable remotely if code can be smuggled into environment variables sent over the network – and it’s surprisingly easy to do so.

According to the NIST vulnerability database, which rates the flaw 10 out of 10 in terms of severity:

GNU Bash through 4.3 processes trailing strings after function definitions in the values of environment variables, which allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a crafted environment, as demonstrated by vectors involving the ForceCommand feature in OpenSSH sshd, the mod_cgi and mod_cgid modules in the Apache HTTP Server, scripts executed by unspecified DHCP clients, and other situations in which setting the environment occurs across a privilege boundary from Bash execution.

Authentication: Not required to exploit

Impact Type: Allows unauthorized disclosure of information; Allows unauthorized modification; Allows disruption of service

An advisory from Akamai explains the problem in more depth, as does this OSS-Sec mailing list post.

Proof-of-concept code for exploiting Bash-using CGI scripts to run code with the same privileges as the web server is already floating around the web. A simple Wget fetch can trigger the bug on a vulnerable system.

You can check if you’re vulnerable by running the following lines in your default shell, which on many systems will be Bash. If you see the words “busted”, then you’re at risk. If not, then either your Bash is fixed or your shell is using another interpreter.

env X="() { :;} ; echo busted" /bin/sh -c "echo completed"
env X="() { :;} ; echo busted" `which bash` -c "echo completed"

Jim Reavis, chief exec of the Cloud Security Alliance, claims the hole is comparable in seriousness to the infamous password-leaking Heartbleed bug in the OpenSSL library that was uncovered earlier this year.

“A large number of programs on Linux and other UNIX systems use Bash to setup environmental variables which are then used while executing other programs,” Reavis explained in a blog post.

“Examples of this include web servers running CGI scripts and even email clients and web clients that pass files to external programs for display such as a video file or a sound file.

“In short this vulnerability allows attackers to cause arbitrary command execution, remotely, for example by setting headers in a web request, or by setting weird MIME types.”

Robert Graham of Errata Security, who suggested the name Shell Shock for the Bash flaw, also said the programming cock-up is as severe as Heartbleed. But he noted: “There’s little need to rush and fix this bug. Your primary servers are probably not vulnerable to this bug.

“However, everything else probably is. Scan your network for things like Telnet, FTP, and old versions of Apache (masscan is extremely useful for this). Anything that responds is probably an old device needing a bash patch. And, since most of them can’t be patched, you are likely screwed.

“A lot of wireless routers shell out to ping and traceroute – these are all likely vulnerable.”

The vulnerability (CVE-2014-6271) affects Apple’s OS X – and is useful for privilege escalation – as well as major flavors of Linux. Fortunately, patches are already available, and distros are ahead of the game in responding to the flap. BSD distros that do not use Bash are safe, obviously. Apple users will need to get their hands dirty until Cupertino issues a fix.

Red Hat security engineer Huzaifa Sidhpurwala has a rundown of the at-risk software, here. ®

Updated to add

Linux vendor Red Hat has warned the patch to fix Bash is not complete, and there are still ways to inject commands via environment variables. In an update at 0310 GMT, Red Hat said:

Red Hat has become aware that the patch for CVE-2014-6271 is incomplete. An attacker can provide specially-crafted environment variables containing arbitrary commands that will be executed on vulnerable systems under certain conditions. The new issue has been assigned CVE-2014-7169. Red Hat is working on patches in conjunction with the upstream developers as a critical priority.

THP Semifinalist: NoteOn Smartpen

Standard

Hackaday

PCB of the NoteOn Smartpen showing components

There are a ton of apps out there for taking notes and recording ideas, but sometimes the humble pen is best. However, if you have the tendency to lose, crumple, or spill caffeinated beverages on your pen and paper notes, having a digital copy is quite nice.

The NoteOn Smartpen by [Nick] aims to digitize your writing on the fly while behaving like a normal pen. It does this by using the ST LSM9DS0TR: a 9-axis inertial measurement unit (IMU). These inertial measurements are processed by a STM32 Cortex M4F processor and stored on the internal flash memory.

To retrieve your notes, the Nordic nRF8001 Bluetooth Low Energy radio pairs the MCU with a phone or computer. The USB port is only used to charge the device, and the user interface is a single button and LED.

The major hardware challenge of this device is packaging it…

View original post 77 more words

Demon In A Bottle

Standard

It’s a great time to be a geek (or NERD).   I have said numerous times that I never (even in MY wildest dreams) thought I would be seeing some of the comic books I love come to life like they are now in theaters.

Some of you may recall my excitement leading up to the first Iron Man, and then there was Nick Fury hinting at the Avengers.  No WAY!  I thought they couldn’t pull that off, because there was no established group yet – and we would never see HellCarriers in a movie…..even Hollywood couldn’t do that.

We then got a pretty good Hulk (sadly losing Ed Norton), a passable Iron Man 2, Thor…and then, it all came together with Captain America.  IMO – a near perfect origins story.

When the Avengers came out – Downey stole the screen again, the team came together….AND there were Hellcarriers!

 

At this point, Marvel could do no wrong – and this was proven out this year with Winter Soldier and Guardians of the Galaxy.  Winter Soldier made a super hero movie that plays out like real life (as one can be in the Marvel Universe) and GotG took a product not many had heard of, and made it a phenomenon. 

Remember when I said it was great to be a Geek (or Nerd)?  This is why – because of arguing about how bad a movie was (Fantastic Four anyone?), we can nitpick on the great things – which leads to  this article.

With the current popularity of GotG – you knew at some point we would hit saturation. Everwhere you turn, you have Groot popping up, and now even Marvel is jumping their own shark. 

Over at Comic Alliance, you have the headline Marvel Announces Rocket Raccoon And Groot Homage Covers.  In the article, you learn that Marvel is going forward with some variant art covers, portaying Rocket and Groot in some classic scenes.   Personally, I am underwhelmed – liking only the Thor crossover.  But the one I dispise the most is this one – that take on Demon in a Bottle.

 

RRG06

As cute as baby Groot is, you don’t mess with the inner turmoil of Tony Stark or the possibly one of the greatest storylines in Iron Man history.  Especially when Disney is so afraid to do this story line – because of the kids going to see the movies.  Either you respect the brand (and don’t tease us about it in other movies) or you leave it alone by not marketing to kids with your two new cash cow characters.  You cant have both.

Ugggh – now I want an R-Rated Marvel Universe movie (please do  a Punisher movie right!).

See what I mean – the world is so great in the Marvel Universe, we are debating (we cant even argue) about variant comic covers.  Life is good!  Am I off base on the Demon in a Bottle debate?  Who is your favorite Marvel character?  Most glaring nit-pick?  Debate it all below.

Cheers – and make mine Marvel.

Revisiting an old post and the FLR-9

Standard
After reading the article “The Wullenweber Array (CDDA): An Era Of Intelligence Gathering”, I was reminded of an article I wrote over on SmokesAndBooze.Com called – This Day in History Aug 17 1987.  This story linked Rudolf Hess, Gablingen Germany and a bit of my history all into one story.  As an added bonus – we get a picture of a FLR-9 on a beer label. 
So – I thought I would repost here on my personal blog….and I highly encourage you to visit the timeline above about the Wunneweber Array….a marvel in caging elephant.
Enjoy-
 

(On Aug 17 1987) Rudolf Hess was found hanged by an electrical cord at Spandau Prison, aged 93. He was incarcerated there for 40 years, 21 of those years as the solitary inmate. In 1941 Hess flew to Scotland with ideas of peace in his head, making Hitler very very upset.

Why does this make the blog “Smokes and Booze”? – Hang in there, there is a payoff.

Rudolf Hess was a prominent Nazi politician who was Adolf Hitler’s deputy in the Nazi Party during the 1930s and early 1940s, was an SA commander during the failed Beer Hall Putsch (but that doesn’t qualify him here), transcribed Mein Kampf for Hitler and eventually rose the rank of Deputy Fuhrer.

What brings him up today on S&B happened later in his life. 

During the later parts of WW2, Hess privately hoped that he could convince Britain to join Germany as an ally.  So on the  10th of  May 1941, Hess (a competent flier) took off from Augsburg in a Messerschmitt Bf 110 (radio code VJ+OQ) which he had equipped with drop tanks to increase its range.  He later crashed his plane and demanded to see the Duke of Hamilton.
Hess was tried at Nuremburg and was given a life sentence, that ended on this day in history when he committed suicide. Flr-9-2

What links Hess to S&B is not the man himself, but where he chose to steal his Messerschmitt from;  Gablingen Field, Augsburg Germany.

You see, Gablingen Airfield was captured by the Americas at the close of WW2 and later converted to a Military Intelligence Station for monitoring electronic traffic during the Cold War.   The large “Elephant Cage” Antenna (a FLR-9) was the most prominent (and talked about) feature of the base.

When I arrived in 1992 to work on Trojan Classic and Trojan Spirit as a government contractor, we had offices in what affectionately called “The Back 40” – First in abandoned buildings in a compound within a compound, left over from WW2, and later in in the last remaining (of two) hangers left over from that faithful day  on 10 May 1941. 

Old Trisa

Again, even my crazy ties to this story (and I wont even get into “The Vagabond Series” with Glenn and Jeremy – That is a whole 10-15 different blog posts) are not what brings this to S&B.

Instead, we go to a brewery – Thorbräu, one of the oldest breweries in Germany, founded in 1582 in Augsburg, Bavaria.  You see, beer is such a part of German culture that everyone drank all the time.  In many cases, there German Contractors/Soldiers on the bases, and once the Military went “Dry” at lunch during the 80’s, the Germans still had a right to drink during the day.  Since Gablingen was a Military Intelligence installation, it had to have items specially vetted prior to bringing on base…..and so Thorbräu had a special beer made for the installation, believed to be the only one of its kind.  The label even depicted the secret base and it’s trademark antenna.

20374_1205813273571_1475839143_30565630_1832316_n

As Paul Harvey would say – And now….you know the rest of the story.

Jump over to the S&B Facebook Page for some pictures of Gablingen (Then and Now)